Fintech visa

Fintech sector gearing for a new visa

February 25, 2021 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

The UK government is keen to maintain the global standing of the UK’s fintech sector, and as a result, a new visa fast track scheme for those working in the fintech industry is yet to be announced. The announcement for the same is expected from Rishi Sunak, the UK chancellor, in his 2021 budget on 3rd March. 

The financial technology sector is one of the most growing sectors globally, and in the UK itself, it is a £7 Billion industry. With the world being under lock and key, 38% of Fintech firms in the UK are expected to grow by 101%. (Source: statistica.com)

The decision to bring this new category’s is an attempt to bridge the fintech sector’s gap due to Brexit. Fintech is already an approved skillset under Tech Nation guidance. We are keen to learn more about this new Fintech fast track category, whether this will be an independent visa from the Global Talent Visa.  

The 2019 PwC report revealed that more than 50% of financial institutions are planning to hire ‘gig-based workers’ as COVID has made people realise the digital world’s power and its reach beyond borders. 

Approved sources suggest that the new visa scheme’s final details are yet to be drawn, and those within the industry expect the launch of this new visa scheme to be similar to the UK Research and Innovation visa scheme.  The latest was brought as an addition to the existing Global Talent Visa scheme, and it was created to attract the world’s leading scientists to come to the UK.

Shawn Tan, CEO of Skymind, an AI firm, said, “As an international company that has recently set up its operations in London, we want to make sure that we can hire the talent we need.”

He added that the UK already has an advanced ecosystem, favourable regulation and an openness to innovation that is not found in other countries. “Combining these factors with a steady pipeline of highly skilled workers will keep the fintech sector thriving for years to come,” he said. (source: computerweekly.com)

The new visa category is good news, and we believe it could attract a significant number of new migrants with fintech skills in the UK.

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

British musicians can play on in Europe – with a bit of planning

British musicians can play on in Europe – with a bit of planning’

February 02, 2021 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

Director of top UK immigration law firm, Mr. Yash Dubal, has some words of advice for British musicians and artists facing tough times with restrictions on touring following Brexit.  

The enormous upheaval of Britain’s exit from the European Union has taken a dramatic hit on many of our industries. One of the latest professions to find itself mired in the fall-out is that of musicians who now find their ability to tour across EU nations severely compromised.  

In fact, a much wider spectrum of professions has been affected, as we are talking not only about musicians but all those involved with bands, artists, orchestras, musical theatre and even TV and sports personalities.  

There has been a recent high-profile campaign – backed by many big names in the entertainment industry – for the UK government to negotiate a free cultural work permit with the EU.  Sadly, I don’t hold out much hope in the short to medium term of this bearing fruit.  

There has already been much mud-slinging on this subject with both the UK government and the EU bitterly blaming the other for this situation. On that basis, I cannot see there being any kind of resolution any time soon.  

But that’s not to say that touring will be untenable. It’s just to say that, unfortunately, British musicians, artists and others working in this sector will have to face up to the fact that touring and working in EU countries is simply going to require much more organization and advanced planning.   

But what has perhaps been missed is that if you look at individual EU nations, many make allowances for the likes of musicians and artists to work for short periods without a visa.   

I won’t go through the whole list, but, for example, in the Czech Republic, there is a visa exemption for artists whose performance there does not exceed seven consecutive days or 30 days per calendar year.   

In Italy, musicians will only need to write to the visa office ([email protected]) if they do not belong to the category of well-known artists or plan to stay in Italy for more than 90 days. Germany has yet to confirm its arrangements but in Poland it will be visa exempt for a period of up to 30 days in one year. Visas are also exempt in Latvia for artists whose performances do not exceed 14 days per year.   

However, other nations have more complex, detailed visa requirements which will require some advanced planning so that all paperwork is in place.  

In the case of musicians and artists from the EU 27 nations wanting to come here to perform, there is a quick and reasonably easy route through the Permitted Paid Engagement (PPE) visa – but they would need to have been invited by a UK organization to take part in ‘arts, entertainment or sporting activities including broadcasting’.  

Another interesting point is that some large music events in the UK can apply to be included on a list of ‘permit free festivals’. This means that overseas musicians and bands invited to such events can avoid some of the red tape, and possibly get in on the Standard Visitor visa. However, as I write this, this year’s Glastonbury Festival has already been cancelled due to the pandemic, so it’s unclear how useful this route will be for a while!  

I’m afraid that the bad news for UK musicians is that, frankly, it is much easier for overseas artists to come here and perform using the PPE visa than for British artists who will need to go through a myriad of options for each EU country. Unfortunately, it is what it is and they will have to familiarize themselves with the process of obtaining the relevant visas in some cases. 

But don’t panic. I sometimes tell clients that immigration and visa law looks far more complicated and daunting than it actually is. Yes, it can be a bit time-consuming, but once you get used to it, it should not prove too difficult. I understand these restrictions seem as if they will pose great hardship but they can be overcome. My advice to musicians is to play on – your fans across Europe will thank you for it!

Musician’s Union –   @WeAreTheMU
Association of Independent Music –  @AIM_UK
BPI –  @bpi_music
Featured Artists Coalition –   @FeaturedArtists
ILMC –  @ILMC
Music Managers Forum –  @MMFUK
Music Venue Trust –  @musicvenuetrust
UK Music –  @UK_Music
Incorporated Society Muscians –  @ISM_music

New Musical Express –  @NME

The Stage –  @TheStage

MOJO Magazine –  @MOJOmagazine

Kerrang! Magazine –  @KerrangMagazine

DJ Mag –  @DJmag

Classical Music –  @ClassicalMusic_

BBC Music Magazine –  @MusicMagazine

Audience Magazine –  @Audience-Mag

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

ONS pandemic stats

Migration into the UK has crashed in the year since the first lockdown

February 01, 2021 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

It is too early to know the exact effect Brexit will have on migration, and we now have to also consider the pandemic which is arguably a more profound factor in the patterns of global migration. Coronavirus will continue to influence global movements throughout 2021 and 2022.

In terms of the effect of Brexit and the new immigration law in the UK, the UK government estimates the points-based system will reduce annual migration from long-term EU workers by over 70% during the first five years of the policy implementation. This means a decline in long-term EU worker inflows, from over 100,000 to between 20,000-40,000 annually. This reduction in long-term EU migrants is estimated to have a cumulative fiscal cost of between £1 billion and £3 billion over the first five years of the policy (2021 to 2025).

 

The newly updated lower skill threshold of the proposed point based system makes 151 new occupations eligible for the long term non-EU workers. This lowering of the skill requirement, in conjunction with lower salary thresholds, are assumed to increase the immigration of this group by between 10,000 to 30,000 per year.

 

This increase in long-term non-EU worker migration is estimated to have a potential cumulative fiscal benefit for the UK of between £1 billion and £4 billion over the first five years of the policy.

The estimates seem to be accurate. At A Y & J Solicitors we have seen a surge in interest from Asia and this is all driven by specific relaxations in UK immigration rules. When we analyse the new system, rather than deterring people, the measures put in place are encouraging more people to come to the UK – which is the message the government would seem to have people believe.

The Government’s estimates, however, do not consider the effects of the pandemic. While there have been no definitive studies on the effect coronavirus has had on UK migration, initial studies suggest the impact has been profound.

 

A blog published earlier this year by the government-funded Economic Statistics Centre of Excellence (ESCoE) reported up to 1.3m people born abroad left the UK between the third quarter of 2019 and the same period in 2020. Estimated 700,00 foreign-born residents have moved out of London, constituting the largest exodus in the UK since World War II.

Another recent study by the Office of National Statistics predicts the effect will be substantial.

Drawing from a wide range of sources, the study found a substantial decrease in passengers travelling internationally, along with a fall in the number of visa applications issued for work and study to non-EU nationals. There was a significant decline in work-related activity for non-British nationals and non-UK-born residents. It also recorded a decline in the number of National Insurance numbers (NINos) allocated, which are needed to work in the UK.

 

The report concluded that these combined factors suggest ‘mobility and migration have changed significantly since March due to the impact of the coronavirus pandemic’.

 

Since 2016, the long-term international migration to the UK was stable, but the 12 months leading up to the pandemic, driven by an increase in non-EU student arrivals (mainly from China & India), saw migration levels jump, taking the net migration for the year up to March 2020 at around 313,000.

 

Visa applications & grants, affected by travel bans & lockdowns fell significantly between April and June 2020 (the first UK lockdown). Long-term work and study visas were down by 85% and 99%, respectively when compared to the same period in 2019.

 

However, as visa application centres reopened from June 2020, there was an uplift in applications being issued between July and September 2020, but figures were still lower than the same period in 2019. In the year ending September 2020, 93,000 work and 161,000 study visas were granted, which is 100.000 and 41,000 fewer work and study visas respectively.

 

The uplift recorded when visa centres opened, along with the large rises in inquiries we have seen at A Y & J Solicitors, suggests that the demand is there and remains buoyant.

 

Another factor which supports this is the rise in applications for Tier 1 (Investor) visas which are issued to non-UK individuals if they have a minimum of £2m to invest in qualifying assets in Britain.

 

In the first quarter of 2020, 45 people applied, in the second quarter only 23 applied but in Q3, there were 96 applications. Approx 45% of the total applicants  were from mainland China (23) and Hong Kong (20).  Russians and Americans constituted 9% applications each.

 

While the numbers are still low, they suggest a resurgence in interest in the UK as a destination for the world’s wealthy.

 

When final Tier 1 Investor visa numbers for 2020 are released there is still expected to be a drop on numbers from previous years, due to the pandemic. In 2018 there were 376 such visas issued, in 2019 there were 360. In the first three quarters of 2020 there were a total of 164.

 

Meanwhile, in the UK, where employers need to be registered to employ migrants coming to the UK on Tier 2 visas, only a small percentage of businesses are on the approved sponsor list. There are just over 33,000.

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

Remote foreign workers

Remote foreign workers

January 17, 2021 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

Future UK workforces could consist of international employees scattered around the globe who never set foot in the UK. The scenario, which is legally feasible thanks to ambiguous rules, could be an attractive option for struggling businesses looking for novel cost-saving solutions, says one of the UK’s top immigration experts.

Yash Dubal, director of A Y & J Solicitors, predicts that some cash-strapped firms hit by skills shortages will increasingly be forced to look beyond UK shores to find employees. And new home working practices will present more opportunities for overseas workers to work in the UK, virtually.

While many businesses that employ migrant workers struggle to navigate the new points-based immigration system that became law this month, others will be able to circumvent the system, having gained confidence and experience in using remote working technology during the pandemic. 

Employers in the UK can freely employ remote staff in other countries without having to adhere to any of the new rules as long as the employees are not based in the UK. Theoretically this could mean companies which work in sectors where staff do not need to be present in offices, such as IT and marketing, can bolster their workforces with cheaper or more skilled foreign labour who never have to set foot in the UK.

Mr Dubal said: “We could see a complete new culture in workplaces in some sectors where recruitment is no longer bound by geography. There are many positions in many sectors where presenteeism is not required. Many employers have been forced to make changes to their working practices during the pandemic and many are predicted to maintain work-from-home practices permanently for certain positions. Advances in platforms such as Microsoft Teams and Zoom have given them confidence. Theoretically, for these businesses, there is nothing stopping them recruiting in India or China, rather than domestically. “The pandemic has disrupted many elements of business. Recruitment could well be one of them.” 

Legally, in cases where businesses employ overseas based workers, the normal practice is to offer the worker the choice of jurisdiction. However, if no choice of jurisdiction is specified in the contract, then the contract is governed by the law of the country in which the work is generally carried out.

Many countries in Eastern Europe, South America and the Far East have highly skilled staff looking for jobs and these prospective employees come at a fraction of the cost of someone in the UK. Remote employees are particularly attractive for companies seeking workers with skills in data processing, IT support, telesales, product support, software and web technologies.

According to HR consultants TimelessTime, regulations are vague. 

It states: “Fundamentally, UK firms can’t employ foreign workers directly, without local registration and (in most cases) presence. Nonetheless, conceptually, a UK firm could issue a UK employment contract to a worker in Bratislava and call them an employee – even though the concept would be meaningless. Because such foreign ‘employees’ will never visit the UK, there is possibly no UK tax liability either for the company or the ‘employees’ despite the fact that their efforts will generate income for the British ‘employer’. Under this arrangement it seems possible to run monthly payroll and pay these foreign workers as if they are employees on an NT (No Tax) code. They are then paid gross. We are aware of some UK firms doing this.”

Foreign workers employed in this way have no locally enforceable employment rights and would effectively be self-employed in their own country. Tax liabilities falling on the UK employer remain unclear. 

Mr Dubal concludes: “The pandemic has disrupted many elements of business. Recruitment could well be one of them.”

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

An easy fix to solve the healthcare staff crisis

An easy fix to solve the healthcare staff crisis

December 15, 2020 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

Immigration experts A Y & J Solicitors have pinpointed a simple change to UK visa rules which will alleviate a healthcare manpower shortage that threatens to hamper the UK’s covid-19 reaction.

According to reports migrant healthcare workers are having to return to their countries of origin after their visas expire, potentially hampering Britain’s response to the coronavirus. Trade unions and charities have called on the government to stop forcing out key workers in the health and care sectors and to stop barring potential new ones from coming to work here.

However, Yash Dubal, Director of A Y & J Solicitors, explains that Home Office provision already offers free visa extension for healthcare workers and that the new Heath and Care Visa (Tier 2) offers reduced fees and no immigration health surcharge for qualified applicants and their families.

The real issue, he says, is the skills level at which the visa threshold is set. In order to work in the UK, migrants must be a qualified doctor, nurse, health professional or adult social care professional. Many of the unfilled vacancies in the health and care sector are for roles classified as low skilled, which means they do not meet the requirements of the Health and Care Visa and so cannot be filled by overseas workers.

Mr Dubal says the best way to ensure there are enough workers to fill these key worker posts is to reclassify the professions as skilled roles. By doing this they can then be added to the Home Office list of shortage occupations and foreign workers could then be sponsored at the lower salary threshold, making it affordable for the NHS and private care firms to recruit overseas labour.

Mr Dubal explains: “There is a need for low-skilled health care staff such as carers but there currently does not seem to be enough domestic candidates to fill the available roles. The solution would be for the Home office to reclassify care workers and home carers up from the lower-skilled classification they currently hold to RQF Level 3. They could then be added to the Shortage Occupation List and foreign workers could be sponsored at a lower salary of £20,480, rather than the minimum £25,600 needed under the new points-based system. This would then become affordable for the care industry which could remain competitive and continue providing care for those who need it the most and who get little government support.”

New figures released by the Nursing and Midwifery Council show that although 8,000 nursing staff have joined the health service in the past six months there are still 40,000 vacancies in England. Only half of the new nurses are qualified to carry out full nursing duties. According to the Kings Fund, at least 5,000 nurses a year need to be recruited in the short term to deal with immediate shortfalls.

When care sector shortfalls are added, the shortages are acute. Unison says that across both health and care sectors there are 122,000 vacancies. The trade union reports that along with key workers forced to return to their home countries, many who are still in the UK are struggling to renew their visas due to delays and prohibitive costs and have become overstayers as a result, something which can further hamper their ability to renew their visas.

Mr Dubal says if this is the case, the Government needs to review visa costs for key workers further.

“If the country is short of key health and care workers and those already working here are struggling because of the fees they have to pay it would be common sense to reduce those fees and enable the workers we do have to stay. Particularly when we are in the grip of a second wave of Coronavirus and in need of key workers.”

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

New immigration crisis threatens UK’s thriving tech industry

New immigration crisis threatens UK’s thriving tech industry

December 10, 2020 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

The UK’s thriving tech industry – which already has a desperate shortage of skilled workers – could be on the brink of a new crisis, according to a top immigration expert. 

A host of sectors are crying out for professionals, with IT business analysts, architects and systems designers as well as programmers and software development professionals and web designers all making it onto the Government’s official ‘shortage list’ – meaning a green light has been given to recruit from abroad. 

However, with big changes to the nation’s immigration procedure just weeks away with the end of the Brexit transition process, there could be chaos as employers may find themselves unable to recruit professionals internationally to help fill these positions. 

Recent research shows that only two per cent of British companies have registered to employ overseas workers when the new changes come in on January 1st – which means they will be restricted from access to the rich pool of foreign skilled personnel after that date. 

Mr Yash Dubal, director of London-based A Y & J Solicitors and an expert on Immigration and Visa law, warns there is no time to lose to prepare for the new regulations.  

He said, “This demand for highly skilled tech workers is only going to grow – and fast. The World Economic Forum has already predicted that by 2022, these digital industries will generate 133 million new jobs worldwide. Here in the UK, we will be competing with the rest of the world to lure the cream of this talent to our shores. The fact that many vital digital roles have now made it onto the shortage list is worrying and unless this demand for professionals with these highly sought-after digital skills can be met, it will hold British businesses back from economic growth.” 

And Mr Dubal says the lack of preparedness for the new immigration regulations will harm tech businesses. 

He adds, “Industry leaders in these sectors have always relied on being able to recruit the best talent from across the world. So it’s shocking to me that so few businesses seem aware of these rules. My advice would be to make preparations now to make sure the UK’s digital sector continues to thrive.” 

UK employers wishing to hire skilled migrants must be registered on the Government visa sponsor scheme when the new immigration rules come into effect. Currently the scheme only applies to workers from outside Europe but after January 1st, 2021, all overseas workers will require a visa under the new Points-Based Immigration System.  

Worryingly, Mr Dubal, believes that not enough is being done by the government to raise awareness and he says that many employers are unaware of the requirement to register.  

He said, “While there has been a campaign about the new points-based system, hardly any of it has been aimed at employers to tell them that they need to register if they plan to hire skilled workers from abroad next year.”   

Mr Dubal also believes that the current sponsor registration system needs to be overhauled to make it easier and cheaper for British employers to recruit skilled migrants and bridge the skills gap. After January 1st, businesses must pay an Immigration Skill Charge (ISC) of £1,000 per year for each skilled overseas worker they employ.  

He adds, “The Home Office does not make it easy and there seems to be a policy of discouragement. British companies are facing personnel shortages. The problem can be addressed by hiring from abroad, where there is a huge and highly skilled pool to pick from. It makes good sense to make this hiring process easy.” 

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

A Y & J Solicitors celebrate recognition by Chambers UK

A Y & J Solicitors celebrate recognition by Chambers UK

October 30, 2020 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

London-based immigration specialists A Y & J Solicitors are celebrating after being recognised as one of the leading UK law practices by Chambers and Partners UK Guide 2021.

Chambers – which provides in-depth analysis of law firms across the country-rated A Y & J Solicitors for its expertise in all aspects of immigration and the firm secured a position in Band 2 in the immigration: personal practice area.

The rankings were released after assessing the team on technical legal ability, value for money and other factors such as knowledge and experience, ability, effectiveness and client service by individual lawyers. Other qualities on which rankings are assessed include professional conduct, commercial astuteness, diligence and commitment. 

Managing Director Yash Dubal is renowned for his work in areas such as Sponsor Licence, Global Talent Visa and Sole Representative Visa (the UK and India). One client commented, “The A Y & J team are a fantastic, boutique law firm – I really appreciated their professional, experienced approach.”

Mr Dubal has also been praised by clients and partners for his dedication and assistance to end immigration struggles in the UK. His careful observations, straightforward approach,

 and bespoke legal advice has helped entrepreneurs, business owners, highly skilled workers and Global Talent Visa applicants.

Speaking of his delight at the Chambers and Partners ranking, Mr Dubal said, “I feel very proud of the team here at A Y & J Solicitors. After 10 years of practice, it’s an honour to have our work recognised and I believe it endorses our commitment to providing the best possible service to our clients.”

Chambers and Partners have been a trusted legal market source for more than 30 years, surveying and interviewing clients and lawyers across the United Kingdom to determine leaders in their field.

In the section, ‘what the team is known for’, Chambers and Partners described A Y & J Solicitors as a ‘specialist immigration firm known for its work on complex personal immigration matters. Acts for a range of private clients including highly skilled migrants, spouses and partners of British citizens and EEA nationals, and students. Particularly adept at challenging Home Office refusals regarding applications for residence cards and leave to remain’.

Applauding the firm’s strengths, Chambers added that, ‘A Y & J Solicitors is amazing. With more than 400+ reviews on Trustpilot and thank you cards sent by clients displayed in the review section, clients have given them excellent ratings and 4.9 stars. They hold a track record of handling clients timely and in a professional manner. Most of the clients say that if anyone is struggling with immigration issues they should consult A Y & J Solicitors. They give clients straight answers after analysing the case’.   

Among those celebrating the good news at A Y & J Solicitors are practitioners Diana Todirica, Anita Salako, Shurui (Jenny) Han and the rest of the team. Yash Dubal is a key contact and also managing director of the organisation. 

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

Talent crisis’ warning as immigration upheaval threaten the artS

‘Talent crisis’ warning as immigration upheaval threaten the arts

October 06, 2020 | Post by A Y & J Solicitors

The arts industry will face a talent crisis if it does not prepare for new immigration rules which will kick in within weeks. 

There is already a skills shortage in the UK across several sectors, including ballet and contemporary dancers, choreographers, musicians, arts officers, producers and directors. 

These key roles are on the government’s list of ‘shortage occupations’ – meaning that a green light has been given to recruit from abroad. 

But a leading immigration expert has sounded the alarm as only three per cent of British companies have registered to employ overseas workers when the new changes come in on January 1st – which means they will be restricted from access to the best international talent after that date. 

Mr Yash Dubal, director of London-based A Y & J Solicitors and an expert on Immigration and Visa law, suggests there is no time to lose to prepare for the new regulations. 

Mr Dubal said, “The UK is rightly proud of its incredible arts industry. But if it wants to continue as one of the best in the world, then the industry must be able to recruit from the rich pool of international talent to help ensure our theatres and orchestras continue to thrive. Revised immigration and visa regulations will mean reduced access to the cream of the crop for those who are not prepared and a possible talent crisis.” 

Some industry professionals have blamed the government’s lack of investment in the sector as a reason for there being a shortage of individuals who possess the very highest skills required by the likes of orchestras and dance companies – which had often meant recruiting from EU nations, until the spectre of Brexit created upheaval. 

Now, UK employers wishing to hire skilled migrants must be registered on the government visa sponsor scheme when new immigration rules come into effect. Currently the scheme only applies to workers from outside Europe but after January 1, 2021, all overseas workers will require a visa under the new Points-Based Immigration System. 

Worryingly, Mr Dubal, believes that not enough is being done by the government to raise awareness and he says that many employers are unaware of the requirement to register. 

He said, “While there has been a campaign about the new points-based system, hardly any of it has been aimed at employers to tell them that they need to register if they plan to hire skilled workers from abroad next year.”  

Mr Dubal believes that the current sponsor registration system needs to be overhauled to make it easier and cheaper for British employers to recruit skilled migrants and bridge the skills gap. Currently, businesses must pay Immigration Skill Charge (ISC) between £364 to £1000 per year for each skilled overseas worker they employ. 

“The Home Office does not make it easy and there seems to be a policy of discouragement. British companies are facing personnel shortages. The problem can be addressed by hiring from abroad, where there is a huge and highly skilled pool to pick from. It makes good sense to make this hiring process easy.” 

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors

A Y & J Solicitors is a multi-award winning, 10+ years experienced, recommended by Legal 500, boutique UK immigration law firm based in Central London. Having assisted 4000+ clients, we are well equipped to help you with our ‘In It To Win It’ approach. For your assurance and confidence, we are pleased to share our trust rating of 4.9/5 based on 700+ reviews on Trustpilot & Google.

10+ years, Legal 500 recommended with over 5000+ positive reviews